Erdoğan and the Penguin: satire in modern Turkey

It’s usually a happy coincidence when something you’re writing about comes barging onto the topical agenda, but when the bull takes the form of the president of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and the china shop is satire itself, it’s rotten luck you’ve fallen on (although it certainly vindicates your focus). Continue reading Erdoğan and the Penguin: satire in modern Turkey

Lignes claires: fragmented identity in Belgian satirical magazines

People write off Belgium as something of a ‘non-country’. This is unfair, although it’s understandable why some people might think this; e.g., there is no such language as ‘Belgian’ – Belgium famously comprises two major linguistic zones, a poorer  French-speaking southern region called Wallonia (people from which are called ‘Walloons’) and a wealthier Dutch-speaking northern region called Flanders (people from which are ‘Flemish’ or ‘Flemings’). There is a small enclave of German-speakers on its border to the east. Continue reading Lignes claires: fragmented identity in Belgian satirical magazines